Service Dog Information

---Note: It is illegal to represent your dog as a Service Dog if your dog is not a Service Dog.---

Here is some information on the differences in the different working dogs.

Service Dogs: A person must be legally disabled and under the ADA, a service animal is defined as a dog that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability.  The task(s) performed by the dog must be directly related to the person's disability. The dog must be trained to take a specific action when needed to assist the person with a disability. For example, a person with diabetes may have a dog that is trained to alert him when his blood sugar reaches high or low levels. A person with depression may have a dog that is trained to remind her to take her medication. Or, a person who has epilepsy may have a dog that is trained to detect the onset of a seizure and then help the person remain safe during the seizure.

Emotional Support Dogs: A person must have a note from a licensed mental health professional in order to legally have an ESA dog. These dogs provide an increased comfort level for their owner, particularly in social situations. These dogs do not have ADA public access rights but they are allowed to fly with their owners and qualify for no-pet housing. (check with your airline before flying, rules change)

Therapy Dogs: A trained dog that meets the needs of others such as; visiting nursing homes, hospitals, schools, etc while doing pet therapy work. The handlers do not have ADA public access rights with Therapy Dogs and must have permission from an establishment to enter. Please make sure your dog is trained properly.